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“The greatest danger I see is this: that people will begin to welcome violence into their hearts, and in this way diminish their own souls.”

OSCAR ARIAS, FORMER PRESIDENT, COSTA RICA
1986 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE LAUREATE
ON THE COMMUNITY.COM
“The actions taken should not deepen tensions and further divide the world for it is in those circumstances of strife and division that terrorism finds fertile ground.”

 

NELSON MANDELA, DESMOND TUTU, F.W. DE KLERK,
SOUTH AFRICA
1994, 1983 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
“I am confident that the United States as a great and powerful nation will be able to overcome this present tragedy. The American people have shown their resilience, courage and determination when faced with such difficult and sad situations.”

 

HIS HOLINESS THE DALAI LAMA,
TIBETAN GOVERNMENT IN EXILE
1989 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
“There are times, when the use of force is legitimate and necessary. In the face of evil, invocation of false pacifism leads to inaction and betrayal of the victims of oppression.”

 

JOSE RAMOS-HORTA
EAST TIMOR
1996 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
“If the terrorists believe they can isolate their living targets by condemning them to fear and sadness, they are mistaken. Americans have never been as united. Nor has our hope been as profound and as irresistibly contagious.”

 

ELIE WIESEL
UNITED STATES
1986 NOBEL PEACE PRIZE

Crisis: The Nobel Peace Prize Laureates’ Statements on 9/11

In the days following 9/11, The Community gathered the responses of most of the Nobel Peace Prize laureates in response to the shocking events.

When the Associated Press ran an article, it was The Community’s international debut. The site was talked about on NPR, on the CNN morning show; it was covered by the Washington Post, LA Times, Chicago Tribune, Malaysia New Straits Times, Hong Kong Morning Post, and others around the world. It was selected the number two site of the year in USA Today’s top ten sites of the year.

The site is currently housed in the US Library of Congress as part of their archive on 9/11.

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