• Since 1990, child mortality for those under 5 has fallen by 47 per cent around the world.
  • In 2013, 6.2 million children died before reaching their fifth birthday. It is a sharp decrease from 1990, when more than 12 million children died under age five – but it is not good enough.
  • More than half of these early child deaths are due to conditions that could be prevented or treated with access to simple, affordable interventions.
  • Leading causes of death in under-five children are preterm birth complications, pneumonia, birth asphyxia, diarrhoea and malaria. About 45% of all child deaths are linked to malnutrition.
  • Children in sub-Saharan Africa are more than 15 times more likely to die before the age of five than children in developed regions.
  • There were an estimated 207 million malaria cases worldwide in 2012, mostly pregnant women and children.
  • Malaria claims the lives of 483,000 children per year — 90% of those in Africa. That’s 1,300 kids who lose their lives to a mosquito bite every day, or roughly one child every minute.
  • An insecticide treated bednet can drastically reduce the chances of a child contracting malaria. UNICEF, UN Foundation’s Nothing But Nets, Malaria No More and other programs have been effective in providing bet nets to large numbers of children and pregnant women, particularly in South Sudan. As a result Malaria deaths dropped 25% between 2000 and 2010.
  • Dracunculiasis, also called guinea worm disease, is an infection by the guinea worm. A person becomes infected when they drink water that contains water fleas infected with guinea worm larvae. About one year later, the person develops a painful burning feeling as the female worm forms a blister in the skin, then comes out of the skin over a few weeks. During this time, it may be difficult to walk or work.
  • In 1986 there were 3.5 million reported cases of Guinea Worm. In 2013 there were only 18 cases. Where in the 1980s 20 countries were affected by the worm, today only 4 countries are. It will likely be the first parasitic disease to be eradicated. This progress is largely attributed to the Carter Center’s extremely effective program to fight the disease.
  • Immunization currently averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year. But an estimated 21.8 million infants worldwide are still missing out on basic vaccines.
  • The UNFoundation’s Shot@ Life program, which builds private/public partnerships to vaccinate children in Africa, and other programs are working to change this statistic.
  • The interventions needed to save these children are, for the most part, known. Existing high-impact, low-cost interventions such as vaccines, antibiotics, micronutrient supplementation, insecticide-treated bednets, improved breastfeeding practices and safe hygiene practices have already saved millions of lives.